Fox dating show 1990s online dating man seeking for love in marysia

Then they go on TV and all three of the guys (or girls) are given quotes from the three they dated and have to pick who said what. Also he kept things from getting TOO nasty if one date went terribly wrong (although those were the funniest).

It all led to some truly funny stories about the dates. Also I hate these shows that go out of their way to humiliate people--this show didn't.

“I’ve always wanted to host a game show and this is the perfect one for me because it mixes what I already do, which is ask really personal questions,” says the television-executive-turned-celebrity, who used to head development at Bravo.

“It capitalizes on everything that I love to do — digging for personal details is something that I started doing with the Housewives many years ago.” Funny enough, Cohen says when he was in charge of programming at the NBCUniversal cabler, he tried to nab the “Love Connection” format for the net with plans for someone else to host, since he was in the midst of his executive days.

Though the environment is familiar to Cohen with a live audience and a cushy couch for conversation with guests, this is not “Watch What Happens Live.” Rather, the Bravo personality is taping an episode of “Love Connection,” the revival of the dating game show, which premieres Thursday night on Fox.

“Love Connection” shot over a period of about one week, bringing the New York-based Cohen to Los Angeles to do what he does best: prod into people’s personal lives.

The audience sees only the game; an important feature of all dating game shows is that the contestants have little or no previous knowledge of each other, and are exposed to each other only through the game, which may include viewing a photograph or at least knowing the basic criteria for participation (typically participants are not already married).

The person behind the screen could hear their answers and voices but not see them during the gameplay, although the audience could see the contestants.NO ONE took it seriously and they also tried different ways to keep the show fresh--one had everybody in 1940s costumes and was shot in black & white, then the 50s, the 60s, the 70s and ended the week with the 80s!Again no masterpiece but I had a lot of fun watching this.The next half of the show would be an interview with a previous pair of contestants, in which they would describe their evening together in very explicit detail.The premise was pretty simple--get two guys (or girls), give them a hundred dollars to date three girls (or guys). De Carlo was the perfect host--very quick, smart and funny with the comments.